Steven A. Hein

41PahoS7mmL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

 

Dr. Steven A. Hein is the Director of Concordia Institute for Christian studies. He recently wrote one of the best examples of living the Christian life under the Cross versus living in glory. His book The Christian Life: Cross or Glory? was release in 2015.

Quotes

“The king cast off his regal robes and became a helpless baby, a lowly foot-washer, and a shameful cross-bearer. Not very scary, but that is precisely the point . God has love and courtship on His mind. In Jesus, God meets us face-to-face. But incognito! He comes humbly to win us over with a dying, sacrificial love to be His own bride forever. As He conquered the forces of darkness and death, the risen and exalted Christ is still with us. Out of His loving designs, He is humbly hidden in His Gospel, cloaked in mundane human language and the common elements of water, bread and wine . Through these, Word and Sacrament, His Gospel ministry of salvific courtship with frail, sinful people continues. Only now He carries it out through common human bodies like yours and mine. We in His Church have become part of our Lord’s humble disguise!” – Steven A. Hein

“The cross cost Him the humiliation and death of His own Son, and all for the sake of His burning love for us sinful human beings . In the Gospel we truly meet an honest-to -God—God as He truly is— a loving and merciful God.” – Steven A. Hein

“You cannot meet God as He truly is until you have met up with yourself as you really are. God will not be mocked by sham meetings with faceless human beings. We must wear our true face, and that is just what God would provide by meeting Him through His Law. Here we see one of the most unique and distinctive features about Christianity that separate it from all the religions of man. Most religions have a moral code commended to us with the promise that through it we can all become better people. With legal enlightenment and commitment to a virtuous sense of duty, we can all make significant progress in overcoming our perceived moral defects. Do-ability with sufficient resolve is the hallmark of man’s moral precepts. I ought, therefore I can, said the famous moral philosopher Immanuel Kant. He constructed a whole system of ethics based on that assumption. But when we stand in the mirroring light of God’s Law of Life, it casts a shadow of darkness and death about us that elicits the opposite confession: I ought, therefore I don’t and I can’t. God’s Law shows us that our problem is not , at its root, immorality or weak resolve. Ours is a problem of spiritual bankruptcy and death. This is the dark truth that lies tucked away deep in the soul of every sinner that must be faced with all repentant honesty before we can meet the gracious God face-to-face. Our idolatry and deceitfulness of the heart must be confronted for what they are. The gap between what we are and what we ought to be needs to be seen as the great abyss that we are unable to cross.” – Steven A. Hein

“Before the sinner can be raised to life, he must first be forced to descend to the depths of death. Before he can be elevated by God, he must first be humiliated. Before he can be saved, he must first be damned, and before he can live in the spirit, he must first be put to death in the flesh. God condemns us that he may justify us, He condemns us as sinners that he may make us righteous, he slays that he may make alive.” – Steven A. Hein

“Works of loving service just happen as we are grasped again and again by the astonishing reality that the grace and righteousness of Christ are the end of all legal requirements. We are free from the demanding works of the Law, and we are free to turn love outward, to focus on the needs of others as our love and trust in Christ liberates us from preoccupied self-concern.” – Steven A. Hein

“The Gospel is the end of all calculated striving to please, to become acceptable, or to perform to become fit and worthy. We are finally and forever secure in His love to abandon self-concern and burst forth our bottled-up love outward to God and others.” – Steven A. Hein

“What sanctifies and empowers good works is the actual proclaimed Gospel the very bestowal of the saving gifts of Christ.” – Steven A. Hein

“You cannot meet God as He truly is until you have met up with yourself as you really are. God will not be mocked by sham meetings with faceless human beings. We must wear our true face, and that is just what God would provide by meeting Him through His Law. Here we see one of the most unique and distinctive features about Christianity that separate it from all the religions of man. Most religions have a moral code commended to us with the promise that through it we can all become better people. With legal enlightenment and commitment to a virtuous sense of duty, we can all make significant progress in overcoming our perceived moral defects. Do-ability with sufficient resolve is the hallmark of man’s moral precepts. I ought, therefore I can, said the famous moral philosopher Immanuel Kant. He constructed a whole system of ethics based on that assumption. But when we stand in the mirroring light of God’s Law of Life, it casts a shadow of darkness and death about us that elicits the opposite confession: I ought, therefore I don’t and I can’t. God’s Law shows us that our problem is not , at its root, immorality or weak resolve. Ours is a problem of spiritual bankruptcy and death. This is the dark truth that lies tucked away deep in the soul of every sinner that must be faced with all repentant honesty before we can meet the gracious God face-to-face. Our idolatry and deceitfulness of the heart must be confronted for what they are. The gap between what we are and what we ought to be needs to be seen as the great abyss that we are unable to cross.” – Steven A. Hein

“The more mature in Christ you become, the less mature you will feel. Growth in Christ brings an increasing awareness of your sinfulness. The peace of God passes this disturbing awareness, but it does not replace it. In other words, you get to debate with the Apostle Paul about who is chief of sinners (I Timothy 1: 15).” – Steven A. Hein

“When the Gospel is not allowed to be God’s final word to sinners, its comfort for burdened consciences is compromised. When the demands of the Law are applied to sinners after the preaching of the Gospel, the Gospel is perverted by being put into the service of the Law. According to the Scriptures, it is the Law that is to be in the service of the Gospel.” – Steven A Hein

“The Gospel does not present an offer or possibility of forgiveness; it unconditionally proclaims it as an already-given reality and bestows it on the sinner. God says, “you ARE forgiven!” Period! There are no if’s, and’s, or but’s that first require us to do something to make it so. We do not have to make a commitment, say a sincere prayer, give our hearts to Jesus, or clean up our lives. Nothing! Some might ask: “But isn’t that cheap grace?” No, it is not “cheap grace;” it is absolutely, unconditionally free!” – Steve Hein (The Christian Life: Cross or Glory?)

Advertisements

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: